Lake Superior Provincial Park


Location: Wawa, Ontario
Region: Northeastern
Character: Natural Environment
Activities:
Rating:
Length/Size: 384,609.6 acres

Lake Superior Provincial Park
By Ontario Parks

From Lake Superiorís rugged coast, this park moves inland over mist-shrouded hills and deep canyons whose breathtaking beauty and rich autumn colours inspired Canadaís Group of Seven artists. The Coastal Trail and part of Highway 17 hug Lake Superiorís rugged, rocky coast through this park, offering spectacular, unimpeded views of the legendary moody blue waters. Along the parkís eastern border the Algoma Central Railway snakes through Agawa Canyon, thrilling sightseers and dropping off hiking and canoeing adventurers along the way. Donít miss the pictographs at Agawa Rock, and the parkís new Visitor Centre.

The park has 249 campsites in three spacious campgrounds.

Agawa Bay Campground
This is the largest with 38 electrical campsites. It has a 3-km beach, small Visitor Centre and outdoor theatre. Flush toilets, showers and laundry facilities are located in the two comfort stations.

Crescent Lake Campground
This campground offers basic camping facilities on 36 sites. It is located near the southern boundary of the park.

Rabbit Blanket Lake Campground
This campground has 20 electrical sites. Located in the north central part of the park, it makes an excellent base for activities in the park's interior. A comfort station has flush toilets, showers and laundry facilities.

Trailer sanitation stations are located at Agawa Bay and Rabbit Blanket Lake campgrounds.

Backcountry Campsites
The park's 175 interior campsites are accessible only by hiking or paddling.

An orange diamond with a black tent silhouette marks canoe route campsites. A small blue diamond with a white tent symbol marks trail campsites.

Cans and bottles are banned and non-burnable refuse must be carried out.

Electric Sites - 58

Hiking
Agawa Rock Indian Pictographs Trail 0.4 km (30 minutes) moderate
This trail is one of the few in Ontario that leads to Indian pictographs.

Awausee Trail 10 km (4-6 hours) strenuous
Hike through a forested valley created by a glacial meltwater thousands of years ago and see four spectacular views of the Agawa Valley.

Coastal Trail 63 km (5-7 days) strenuous
The trail traces the Lake Superior coastline along scenic cliffs, across cobblestone beaches and through bush. Keep your eyes peeled for bald eagles, especially along the Sand and Agawa rivers. Several access points give you a choice of spending one or several days on the trail.

Crescent Lake 2 km (30-60 minutes) easy
Take the family through hardwood forest of 80-year-old yellow birch and majestic, century-old pines.

Nokomis Trail 5 km (1.5 to 3 hours) moderate
This trail follows the Old Woman River through boreal forest to lookouts surveying Old Woman Bay.

Orphan Lake Trail 8 km (2-4 hours) moderate
Panoramic views over Orphan Lake and Lake Superior, a pebble beach and the Baldhead River falls make this a popular trail. Look for the clear transition It between Great Lakes-St. Lawrence forest and northern boreal forest.

Peat Mountain Trail 11 km (3-5 hours) strenuous
On a clear day, you can see Michipicoten Island to the west and Wawa to the north at the top of this long, steep climb. There is plenty to see along the trail for a shorter outing.

Pinguisibi Trail 6 km return (1.5 to 3 hours) easy
Interpretive panels explain the importance of this river, with its rapids and waterfalls, to the Ojibwa.

South Old Woman River Trail 2.5 km (1-2 hours) moderate
Hike through the damp forest by the side of the Old Woman River and see ferns and wildflowers.

Towab Trail 24 km return (2 days) very strenuous
This linear trail follows the Agawa River valley to the 25-metre Agawa Falls.

Trapper's Trail 1.5 km (1 hour) easy
Follow the shoreline of Rustle Lake through a wetland and watch for moose, great blue heron and beaver from the floating boardwalk. Dawn and dusk are the best times to see beaver on this trail.

Education
During the summer, park staff offer evening programs, guided hikes, spirit walks and guest speakers. Look for event schedules on park activity boards.

At Agawa Rock, interpreters are scheduled to talk about the pictographs and natural history of the park.

Fishing
In Lake Superior and in coastal streams and rivers, there are good populations of lake and rainbow trout, whitefish and three species of salmon. Inland waters offer good opportunities for catching lake and brook trout. To prevent the introduction on non-native species, live-bait fish is banned on interior park lakes.

Canoeing
Canoe routes range from easy to challenging and often involve stretches of white water. Pick up a brochure at the visitor centre to guide your choice of canoe route.

Canoeing and kayaking on the open water of Lake Superior is recommended only for those experienced enough to recognize and handle rapidly changing conditions.

Wildlife Viewing
An abundance of wildlife includes moose, commonly seen in the park, and white-tailed deer, whose numbers are limited because of deep snow and severe winters. Occasionally bear are seen near the campgrounds. Also making their home in the park are red squirrels, martens, red foxes, Canada lynx and timber wolves.

More than 250 bird species have been identified within the park. Great blue heron, gulls, loons and several varieties of warblers are among the most common feathered residents.

Boating
Motorboats are permitted on Lake Superior but not within the park, except at Sand Lake where motors no bigger than 10 horsepower are permitted.

Swimming
Beaches are located in each of the three park campgrounds - Agawa Bay, Crescent Lake and Rabbit Blanket Lake.

Winter Activities
The park is gated but accessible for skiing, snowshoeing and ice fishing.

Snowmobiles are prohibited in the park except on Frater Road to access the Algoma Central Railway.

Hunting
Hunting in this park is subject to the Ontario Hunting Regulations. Certain restrictions apply. For more information, contact the park or your local area or district office of the Ministry of Natural Resources.

For more information:
Lake Superior Provincial Park
P.O. Box 267
Wawa, Ontario
P0S 1K0
705-856-2284